2.8 Conclusion

2.8 Conclusion

            In this chapter we have covered some of the hidden complexities related to the term ‘knowledge’ and tried to identify various types of knowledge. We have seen that over the centuries many attempts have been made to define knowledge. Researchers from different domains have viewed knowledge from their own perspective and tried to explore its various dimensions. Some researchers have categorized it as declarative, procedural and conditional; others have classified it as logical, semantic, systemic, and empirical. Yet some researchers classify knowledge as personal, procedural, declarative or prepositional. The classification of knowledge is a recurring theme among religious scholarship as well. Nevertheless, in this chapter we have focused on Knowledge Management track. Under this track we have discussed about explicit knowledge, tacit knowledge, embedded knowledge, embrained knowledge, embodied knowledge, encoded knowledge, and encultured knowledge. The management of all of these types of knowledge is important for an effective knowledge management initiative.

            In this chapter we have also discussed knowledge in an organizational perspective and review various types of knowledge that can exist in an organization and are valuable for knowledge managers and organizations. These include individual knowledge, group/community knowledge, structure knowledge, organizational knowledge, extra-organizational knowledge and inter-organizational knowledge. We have mentioned that organizations act as a repository of knowledge. Their  ability to be agile, successful, improve performance and positively impact its internal knowledge culture will determine the true competitiveness of the organization in today’s knowledge economies.

           We have also discussed that in today’s world, it is important to understand that organizations can hardly learn and innovate in isolation. Therefore organizations must also give due considerations to both internal knowledge as well as external knowledge.  Towards the end of this chapter we have mentioned some key aspects of managerial knowledge relevant to the KM process. Finally we discussed about   personal knowledge which is concerned with the identification of idiosyncratic characteristics—bodily attributes, abilities, psychological traits and interests. For a successful KM initiative it is important for organizations and KM managers to know who has the knowledge or ability to perform particular work in an organization.